China’s ‘crocodile tears’ - CQ Today

China's illegal trade sanctions have had a major impact on our agricultural and resource exports since the coronavirus escaped from Wuhan. China is now targeting our tourism exports too, and specifically the Great Barrier Reef. In two weeks, 21 countries will meet (online) for a conference hosted in Fuzhou, China, which could have a major impact on our economy. In draft documents prepared for the 44th session of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO), it is recommended that the Great Barrier Reef be placed on the "in danger" list. Read more

Less blame, more action - CQ Today

During the past 10 years, Australia’s foreign policy has become dominated by the notion that we benefit from a “rules-based international order”. This has allowed a myth to grow that our relative economic prosperity is thanks to this international order, and the compliance of others to these rules. But these rules have never helped Australia economically to any large degree. The trade rules in the initial Global Agreement on Tariffs and Trade made no progress on helping Australia’s agricultural exports to access overseas markets. Read more

McCormack is all class - CQ Today

Michael McCormack was our nation’s 19th deputy prime minister. While he lost that title this week, no one can take away his membership of this select club and the service he provided to the nation. Michael is a man of impeccable integrity. He worked hard as deputy prime minister. He was a regular visitor to Central Queensland. He was recently here to inspect progress on the Rookwood Weir, one of many projects he got moving as infrastructure minister.   Read more

Barnaby will help restore law of Made in Australia - The Australian

During the past 10 years, Australia’s foreign policy has become dominated by the notion that we benefit from a “rules-based international order”. This has allowed a myth to grow that our relative economic prosperity is thanks to this international order, and the compliance of others to these rules. But these rules have never helped Australia economically to any large degree. The trade rules in the initial Global Agreement on Tariffs and Trade made no progress on helping Australia’s agricultural exports to access overseas markets. Read more

Biloela family case needs to weigh up what’s equitable - CQ Today

When Shakespeare wrote the Merchant of Venice, England had separate courts for the administration of the law and equity. The court of law judged matters on the basis of the ‘common law’ or precedent of England. The Court of Equity (or Chancery) made decisions when the strict application of the common law would lead to harshness or inequity. Shylock, a moneylender in the Merchant of Venice, demanded the strict application of the law, “to have the due and forfeit of my bond”, in his demand for a pound of flesh, when Antonio couldn’t repay a loan. Antonio’s wife, Portia, pleaded for mercy against the strict application of the law, saying in a famous speech, that mercy “blesseth him that gives and him that takes”. Read more

A great Covid hypocrisy - CQ Today

We are constantly told to “listen to the science”. The problem is science can’t talk to us directly, we are told the science by scientists who are human, just like you and me. Last year, scientists told us that any suggestions that the coronavirus came from a lab in Wuhan was a “conspiracy theory”. In a joint letter in the Lancet journal, 27 virologists wrote that: “We stand together to strongly condemn conspiracy theories suggesting that Covid-19 does not have a natural origin” and  that scientists “overwhelmingly conclude that this coronavirus originated in wildlife”. Read more

Time to fire up for coal - CQ Today

Last week 500,000 Queenslanders lost power at a moment’s notice. People got stuck in elevators and traffic chaos ensued. The cause of the power loss was an explosion at the Callide coal-fired power station. Fortunately, no one was injured by the massive blast. And, the power loss lasted only a few hours because other coal fired power stations could ramp up output to replace that lost by Callide. Read more

Battling for Aussie cattle - CQ Today

This weekend marks the 10 year anniversary of the ABC’s Four Corners documentary on live cattle that devastated many people and businesses in Central Queensland. The documentary uncovered shocking mistreatment of cattle, exported from Australia to Indonesia. The animal cruelty was from a limited number of  rudimentary abattoirs, none of which were the direct responsibility of the Australian cattle industry. Read more

Stunning coronavirus win - CQ Today

The biggest economic news in Australia last week was the handing down of the budget. The budget confirmed the enormous debt that the federal government has racked up in the fight against coronavirus. Before Covid, Australian Government debt was expected to hit $650 billion next financial year. Now it has almost doubled to over $1.2 trillion. Read more

Protecting unborn lives - CQ Today

We have sacrificed a lot to protect life over the past year. We shut down shops and schools, we have closed our borders and it remains illegal to leave Australia without permission. I have been pleasantly surprised by how willing Australians have been to protect life even when the costs have been large and those who were most at risk of coronavirus, elderly Australians, only made up a small share of our overall population. Read more


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